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Ilešházi crypt open

THE CRYPT of the Ilešházis, who owned Trenčín Castle for centuries, was opened to the public on All Souls’ Day, after almost a hundred years behind walls. The crypt lies under the parish church in Trenčín, and was kept open for just a few days. The entrance was rediscovered during renovation, the Pravda daily wrote.

THE CRYPT of the Ilešházis, who owned Trenčín Castle for centuries, was opened to the public on All Souls’ Day, after almost a hundred years behind walls. The crypt lies under the parish church in Trenčín, and was kept open for just a few days. The entrance was rediscovered during renovation, the Pravda daily wrote.

A number of visitors showed up, even though entering the crypt requires squeezing through a narrow entrance in the church floor.

“I have been working at the castle for 20 years, so I could not let such an occasion pass unnoticed,” said Ján Žovinec, one of the first visitors to the crypt. “I knew that [the Ilešházis] were the region’s hereditary administrators and the castle’s owners, but I did not know where the crypt was exactly. I will come here again, and bring my children. It is an impressive experience.”

There are no coffins in the crypt. On one side, a bricked up hole leads to the part of the basement where the family’s remains are buried. A board containing the names of the buried is also there.
“Abbot Ľudovít Stárek commissioned the board in 1860,” said Katarína Babičová, head of the Trenčín Museum. “He is known as the rediscover of the Roman inscription on the castle rock. In the 17th century, this inscription had been well-known, but then it was forgotten. The Ilešházis owned the Trenčín estate for 241 years. They were also the hereditary administrators of Trenčín and Liptov.”
The Ilešházis’ crypt will be opened again next All Saints’ Day.

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