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Tax reform author launches new party

RICHARD Sulík, who used to advise former as well as current finance ministers and co–authored Slovakia’s tax reform, is launching a new political party. Its name will be Sloboda a Solidarita (SAS - Freedom and Solidarity), Sulík announced on his blog. According to political scientists, the party, which will advance liberal policies, has a chance for success, the ČTK newswire wrote.

RICHARD Sulík, who used to advise former as well as current finance ministers and co–authored Slovakia’s tax reform, is launching a new political party. Its name will be Sloboda a Solidarita (SAS - Freedom and Solidarity), Sulík announced on his blog. According to political scientists, the party, which will advance liberal policies, has a chance for success, the ČTK newswire wrote.

“After more than a year of contemplation, I’ve decided to found a political party that I hope will attract enough voters to make it into parliament,” said Sulík, who was involved in introducing the 19-percent flat tax.

He said he also chose to set up the SAS because none of the country’s existing parties appeals to him.

Sulík has refused to cooperate with Robert Fico’s Smer party. The new party will be closely aligned with the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), headed by Mikuláš Dzurinda.

The first step of the registration process is for the party to gather 10,000 signatures to be presented to the Interior Ministry.

“There is room for a liberal party on the Slovak political scene, but its representatives have to respect the requirements of potential voters,” sociologist Pavel Haulík said, adding that Sulík embodies principles that voters are willing to accept.

“The system is missing a liberal party that does not consist of former politicians, as has occurred in the past,” political scientist Miroslav Kusý added.

According to Sulík, the new party will push for more personal freedom. He aims to speak more freely about the sources from which politicians receive money to meet their promises.

“Today, parties compete for whom to give more to, but they are silent on whom they will take from in the form of taxes and payroll taxes,” Sulík said.

Three other businessmen are also planning to assist Sulík in financing the party’s launch.

Slovakia will hold its next general elections in 2010.


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