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NBÚ director denies cooperating with communist Intelligence Service

The special Parliamentary Committee to Oversee the National Security Office dealt with media reports about National Security Office (NBÚ) head František Blanárik and his supposed cooperation with the communist era military counterintelligence service, the SITA newswire wrote.

The special Parliamentary Committee to Oversee the National Security Office dealt with media reports about National Security Office (NBÚ) head František Blanárik and his supposed cooperation with the communist era military counterintelligence service, the SITA newswire wrote.

Blanárik dismissed allegations that he knowingly cooperated with the military counterintelligence service of the previous regime.

"I am not, nor have ever been a secret agent," he told journalists after he attended the committee meeting.

He considers the information, which allegedly come from a file kept by the military counterintelligence service in the 1970s, untrustworthy. However, Blanárik admitted that he, as a professional soldier under the previous regime, worked briefly at the intelligence unit of the general staff in 1980, but in his words it was only a few weeks and he worked there only as a janitor after he applied to be moved to another position. That is why he could not have acquired any knowledge about the work of intelligence or counterintelligence services.

Moreover, Prime Minister Robert Fico stated that Blanárik underwent a lie detector test before he got security clearance.

"One cannot easily betray a lie detector. I have full confidence in the vetting process," he said.

The NBÚ's role is to protect classified information from people who are not reliable for security reasons. NBÚ considers deliberate collaborators of the previous regime to be such people. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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