NBÚ director denies being collaborator

FRANTIŠEK Blanárik, the head of the National Security Office (NBÚ), has denied allegations that he knowingly informed on colleagues or cooperated with the military counterintelligence service of the pre-1989 communist regime.

FRANTIŠEK Blanárik, the head of the National Security Office (NBÚ), has denied allegations that he knowingly informed on colleagues or cooperated with the military counterintelligence service of the pre-1989 communist regime.

"I am not, nor have I ever been, a secret agent," he told the media after attending a session on December 2 of the special parliamentary committee which oversees the NBÚ, the SITA newswire reported.
The committee was examining media reports that Blanárik had cooperated with the communist-era military counterintelligence service.

The committee adopted a resolution stating that they had not received any information to confirm or rule out the allegations presented by the media.

The committee will review the case again after it receives archive documents from Prague. Committee chairman Anton Korba asked for them during the last week of November.

The Sme daily has reported that recently uncovered military archives reveal Blanárik knowingly cooperated with the military counterintelligence service.

The NBÚ head said that the information, which allegedly comes from a file kept by the military counterintelligence service in the 1970s, is untrustworthy.

However, Blanárik admitted that as a professional soldier under the communist regime he worked briefly at the intelligence unit of the general staff in 1980.

He said he worked there for only a few weeks, as a janitor, after having applied to be moved to another position. He said he did not acquire any knowledge about the work of the intelligence or counterintelligence services.

The NBÚ conducts security vetting to assess the reliability of people who will handle classified information.

The NBÚ classes those who chose to work closely with the communist regime as unreliable.

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