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Slovakia expects compromise on EU Energy and Climate Package

Foreign Affairs Minister Ján Kubiš said on December 9 that a summary of requirements by industrial firms concerning the European energy and climate package would mean a drastic jump in emissions. EU members will deal with the energy/climate package on Thursday and Friday in Brussels, the SITA newswire wrote.

Foreign Affairs Minister Ján Kubiš said on December 9 that a summary of requirements by industrial firms concerning the European energy and climate package would mean a drastic jump in emissions. EU members will deal with the energy/climate package on Thursday and Friday in Brussels, the SITA newswire wrote.

"If a summary was made, the European Union would do nothing. We want to contribute to improvement so that climate changes do not hit us much harder in 20-30 years," he stated.

The aim of the legislative package to fight climate change prepared by the European Commission would require the EU to cut emissions of carbon dioxide by 20 percent by 2020, to secure 20 percent of the consumed energy from alternative sources and cut energy consumption by a further 20 percent. Prime Minister Robert Fico said Monday that Slovakia would support the package, but with certain reservations.

"We want to support the climate package, but we wish that big countries would take into consideration our previous effort in 1990-2005 to cut emissions," he said.

Slovakia and many other countries of Central and Eastern Europe have already taken a number of steps to reduce CO2 emissions, Kubiš said Tuesday. He insists that they cannot afford to find themselves in an unfavourable situation, as in the previous period they radically cut emissions while many other countries increased them. Kubiš expects a compromise to be reached. Slovakia and other six countries of Eastern and Central Europe came up with a key for viewing quotas.

"We proposed that a certain percentage be preferentially allocated to countries such as ours, which would buffer the impact of inevitable measures," he said.

He added: "We cannot assume that if we do nothing, these changes will fade away.” SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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