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Hungarian Guard abolished by court

The abolition of ultra-nationalist group the Hungarian Guard by a court in Hungary on December 16 has met with great approval in Slovakia, with Prime Minister Robert Fico saying on the next day that the move will help calm relations between Slovakia and Hungary.

The abolition of ultra-nationalist group the Hungarian Guard by a court in Hungary on December 16 has met with great approval in Slovakia, with Prime Minister Robert Fico saying on the next day that the move will help calm relations between Slovakia and Hungary.

Political analyst Miroslav Kusý described the abolition as an accommodating move towards Slovakia. Laws in Hungary are very liberal, and the move was a manifestation of free will that will ease tensions between the two countries. He was echoed by Juraj Marušiak, a political analyst with the Slovak Academy of Sciences, who agreed that the move was accommodating, as the existence of the Guard was one of the Slovak Government's main reservations towards Hungary. The court ruling terminating the organisation was a logical and legitimate move, he said.

The Hungarian Guard was formed in June 2007 out of the non-parliamentary ultra-right Movement for a Better Hungary - Jobbik, and its ranks had swelled to close to 2,000 members. In addition to its public swearing-in ceremonies, the Guard put itself on the map with its anti-Roma demonstrations and vows to defend Hungary from outside aggressors. Prosecutors filed for a disbanding motion after the Guard held a march in the town of Tatarszentgyorgyi during which it chanted anti-Roma slogans. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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