Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Hungarian Guard abolished by court

The abolition of ultra-nationalist group the Hungarian Guard by a court in Hungary on December 16 has met with great approval in Slovakia, with Prime Minister Robert Fico saying on the next day that the move will help calm relations between Slovakia and Hungary.

The abolition of ultra-nationalist group the Hungarian Guard by a court in Hungary on December 16 has met with great approval in Slovakia, with Prime Minister Robert Fico saying on the next day that the move will help calm relations between Slovakia and Hungary.

Political analyst Miroslav Kusý described the abolition as an accommodating move towards Slovakia. Laws in Hungary are very liberal, and the move was a manifestation of free will that will ease tensions between the two countries. He was echoed by Juraj Marušiak, a political analyst with the Slovak Academy of Sciences, who agreed that the move was accommodating, as the existence of the Guard was one of the Slovak Government's main reservations towards Hungary. The court ruling terminating the organisation was a logical and legitimate move, he said.

The Hungarian Guard was formed in June 2007 out of the non-parliamentary ultra-right Movement for a Better Hungary - Jobbik, and its ranks had swelled to close to 2,000 members. In addition to its public swearing-in ceremonies, the Guard put itself on the map with its anti-Roma demonstrations and vows to defend Hungary from outside aggressors. Prosecutors filed for a disbanding motion after the Guard held a march in the town of Tatarszentgyorgyi during which it chanted anti-Roma slogans. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Czech PM files lawsuit against Slovakia at ECHR

Czech Premier Andrej Babiš sues his homeland in the European Court for Human Rights in connection with records proving his collaboration with the communist-era secret police.

Andrej Babiš

Revitalised industrial building offers work, entertainment and housing

Mlynica is an excellent example of successful conversion of unused industrial building.

Mlynica

Youngest Slovak village is a "communist dream come true” Photo

Dedina Mládeže (The Youth Village) was a mere experiment during the communist era. Now, the still inhabited village has morphed into an open-air museum.

Dedina Mládeže

What are the reasons behind low wages in Slovakia?

The average wage costs per Slovak employee accounts for only 44 percent of the EU average.