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Foreign Minister leaves for the UN

THE SLOVAK Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ján Kubiš, attended his last government session on January 21.He is leaving for Geneva to become the executive secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the SITA newswire wrote.

THE SLOVAK Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ján Kubiš, attended his last government session on January 21.
He is leaving for Geneva to become the executive secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the SITA newswire wrote.

“I said goodbye to the government today, so the next government [session] will take place in the presence of my successor,” SITA quoted Kubiš.

The Slovak President will formally relieve him of his duties in the coming days.

Kubiš was supposed to finish as foreign affairs minister a week earlier, but he remained in his post after Prime Minister Fico asked him to stay and help during the negotiations over the gas crisis.
Kubiš’s successor had not been announced by the day he left.

“I have some ideas about who it should or could be, but the decision is the prime minister’s,” said Kubiš.

Slovak media have most often mentioned the names of Igor Slobodník, the director of the political section of the Slovak Foreign Affairs Ministry, and Miroslav Lajčák, currently the EU Special Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, to fill the post of foreign minister after Kubiš.

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