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Introducing Nordic culture

IN CENTRAL Europe February is usually one of the coldest months, and as such it is perhaps the most appropriate time to introduce Nordic culture in Bratislava. Nordfest – Days of Nordic Film, Music and Travel will take place from February 2 to 19 in Film Club Nostalgia and in Kafe Scherz.

IN CENTRAL Europe February is usually one of the coldest months, and as such it is perhaps the most appropriate time to introduce Nordic culture in Bratislava. Nordfest – Days of Nordic Film, Music and Travel will take place from February 2 to 19 in Film Club Nostalgia and in Kafe Scherz.

Starting the tradition of Nordfest was an easy decision for the organisers when they realised that there are many cultures and countries being presented in Slovakia but the Nordic ones were being left behind, Lenka Krajčíková, the marketing and production manager of the festival told The Slovak Spectator.

“Nordic culture is very rich and their cinematography is among the best in the world,” she said. “It definitely has a lot to offer.”

There is a big distance between Slovakia and the north of Europe not only in geographical terms but also when it comes to culture and arts. In Nordic films you can feel great emotions, even melancholy, though their cultural expression is at a very high quality level, Krajčíková said.

“I have no intention of taking Slovak culture down by saying this. I just think that we look at art in a different way,” she explained.

In addition to a concert by Rasmus, a popular rock band from Finland, the film section of the festival is a main attraction.

Prominent guests from the embassies of Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland, interesting speakers, and exciting travelogues will all be part of the festival. For more information, go to www.nordfest.sk.


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