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AROUND SLOVAKIA

Orava Castle attracts more visitors in 2008

AT LEAST 210,000 visitors came to Orava Castle in Oravský Pod-zámok last year, about 22,000 more than in 2007. Slovaks made up about 62 percent of the visitors. The largest number of foreign visitors came from Poland - 24 percent - with an additional 7 percent coming from the Czech Republic and 7 percent from other nations, Mária Jangešáková, the head of the Orava Museum of Pavol Országh Hviedoslav (which is named after the native Slovak poet), told the TASR newswire.

Orava Castle is the most visited in Slovakia. (Source: TASR)

AT LEAST 210,000 visitors came to Orava Castle in Oravský Pod-zámok last year, about 22,000 more than in 2007. Slovaks made up about 62 percent of the visitors. The largest number of foreign visitors came from Poland - 24 percent - with an additional 7 percent coming from the Czech Republic and 7 percent from other nations, Mária Jangešáková, the head of the Orava Museum of Pavol Országh Hviedoslav (which is named after the native Slovak poet), told the TASR newswire.

According to Jangešáková, last year’s activities and events connected with the 40th anniversary of the founding of the museum contributed to the increased number of visitors.

“The castle attracts not just tourists, but also film makers,” Jangešáková was quoted by TASR.

"It attracts young engaged couples who can get married in the splendid Knights’ Hall or in St Michal’s Chapel, as well as outstanding personalities in political, cultural, and public life."



Last year, about 20 events took place at the castle, including very popular ones such as night-time castle tours and fun events for children. The symbolic unlocking of the castle takes place in May and around the same time, the traditional Thurzo festivities are held, including the craftsmen’ fair, the return of the palatine to his summer residence, and a show of folk costumes and other Orava traditions. Orava Castle is open year-round.


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