Modrák made talents from foster homes dance

ON JANUARY 24 the eyes of 52 children lit up as, members of the dance group Modrák, they fulfilled their dreams.

Modrák's talents rocked the dancefloor at the Sme Ball at Bratislava's Reduta.Modrák's talents rocked the dancefloor at the Sme Ball at Bratislava's Reduta. (Source: Sme - Peter Žákovič)

ON JANUARY 24 the eyes of 52 children lit up as, members of the dance group Modrák, they fulfilled their dreams.

Under the leadership of Peter Modrovský, talented children from age 8 to 12 from foster homes throughout Slovakia (Medzilaborce, Hostovice, Spišský Štiavnik, Košice, Ružomberok, Handlová, Hriňová, Piešťany, Topoľčany, Nitra, Holíč, Jelka, and Veľký Meder) performed their routines at two balls: the Golf Players’ Ball at the Holiday Inn and the Sme Daily's Ball at Reduta in Bratislava.
Their enormous energy was rewarded with well-deserved applause.

The Modrák project wants to fulfil big dreams: to be there for all children who need material support or other assistance to develop their talents.

“Many of these children have great talent, musicality, untamed energy – and troubles at school,” Peter Modrovský, a dancer made famous through the TV show Let's Dance, told The Slovak Spectator.
“Often, they can end up on the wrong side of society or the law, he added.

"It would suffice, however, for us to offer them just a little – the time that we would otherwise spend in front of the TV or in shopping centres – to give them our trust, our respect and a sense of life.”

Modrovský explained that as a child he used to be called Modrák, hence the name of the group.
“It's a big challenge for me, to turn their wildness into art.”

Three sponsors, the Clementia foundation, the civic association Šedý Medveď (Grey Bear) and the Dansovia foundation, have high ambitions for the Modrák project.

“The support for young talented dancers not only from foster homes, but also from socially weaker or incomplete families is our main mission,” Modrovský said.

“We want to create a material, institutional, and professional background for them," he added.
"I also came from among such children, but I was lucky enough to meet the right people and only thanks to their help, I got the chance to make it somewhere else. Children should not give up their dreams, especially if they can enrich our human society with their beauty.”

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