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AROUND SLOVAKIA

Back to Eurovision

SLOVAKIA will again have a performer from its musical scene compete in the Eurovision song contest after missing this prestigious event for the past 10 years. The finale of Eurovision 2009, the 54th annual competition, will take place in Moscow on May 16.

SLOVAKIA will again have a performer from its musical scene compete in the Eurovision song contest after missing this prestigious event for the past 10 years. The finale of Eurovision 2009, the 54th annual competition, will take place in Moscow on May 16.

The national round of this popular song contest was announced on December 20 by the public broadcaster Slovak Television (STV); 170 songs were submitted before the closing date on January 20. Fifty songs and their authors have been selected to perform at five semi-final evenings, the TASR newswire reported.

The first semi-final event was broadcast by STV on February 15 and the finale of the Slovak national round is planned for March 8, at point the winner will be chosen for the May event in Moscow. All six contest evenings will be broadcast live by STV.

The Eurovision rules require that songs to be performed during the competition must not have been publicly presented before October 1, 2008, that the performers are over 16 and are Slovak citizens, and that the lyrics of the song are performed in Slovak in the national round.

Slovakia has had four songs and performers in the Eurovision contest. The first was Amnestia na neveru (Amnestied Adultery) by the group Elán, which did not make it to the finals.

The second was Nekonečná pieseň (Endless Song), performed by the group Tublatanka in 1994, which reached 19th place.

In 1996, Marcel Palonder was the third representative from Slovakia with his song Kým nás máš (As Long as You Have Us), which finished in 18th place.

Slovakia’s fourth performer was Katarína Hasprová who sang Modlitba (Prayer), winning 21st place in 1998.

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