Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

AROUND SLOVAKIA

Back to Eurovision

SLOVAKIA will again have a performer from its musical scene compete in the Eurovision song contest after missing this prestigious event for the past 10 years. The finale of Eurovision 2009, the 54th annual competition, will take place in Moscow on May 16.

SLOVAKIA will again have a performer from its musical scene compete in the Eurovision song contest after missing this prestigious event for the past 10 years. The finale of Eurovision 2009, the 54th annual competition, will take place in Moscow on May 16.

The national round of this popular song contest was announced on December 20 by the public broadcaster Slovak Television (STV); 170 songs were submitted before the closing date on January 20. Fifty songs and their authors have been selected to perform at five semi-final evenings, the TASR newswire reported.

The first semi-final event was broadcast by STV on February 15 and the finale of the Slovak national round is planned for March 8, at point the winner will be chosen for the May event in Moscow. All six contest evenings will be broadcast live by STV.

The Eurovision rules require that songs to be performed during the competition must not have been publicly presented before October 1, 2008, that the performers are over 16 and are Slovak citizens, and that the lyrics of the song are performed in Slovak in the national round.

Slovakia has had four songs and performers in the Eurovision contest. The first was Amnestia na neveru (Amnestied Adultery) by the group Elán, which did not make it to the finals.

The second was Nekonečná pieseň (Endless Song), performed by the group Tublatanka in 1994, which reached 19th place.

In 1996, Marcel Palonder was the third representative from Slovakia with his song Kým nás máš (As Long as You Have Us), which finished in 18th place.

Slovakia’s fourth performer was Katarína Hasprová who sang Modlitba (Prayer), winning 21st place in 1998.

Top stories

Soldier detained for theft in the ammunition depot

The theft in the ammunition depot was not used for arming extremists or terrorism.

Ammunition, illustrative stock photo

Governmental campaign should bring Slovaks home from the UK

The Slovak cabinet plans to persuade its expats living and working in the UK with at least a bachelor degree to return home: a campaign offering specific jobs should help.

Young researchers, IT experts and medical staffers are needed in Slovakia, illustrative stock photo.

EU lawyers claiming the Russian annexation of Crimea as legal is a hoax

One lawyer does not mean all EU lawyers; immigrants attacking a shepherd dog and HAARP causing hurricanes in the US are hoaxes, too.

Hoax on immigrants attackign two German shepdherds and ebing bitten yb them

Defense commitments and defense cooperation

NATO membership brings solemn responsibilities as well as benefits, especially today, writes US ambassador to Slovakia.