Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Central Election Commission interprets the Slovak Constitution

A candidate who receives an absolute majority of valid votes from all eligible voters can become president in the first election round. Slovakia’s Central Election Commission agreed on this interpretation of the Constitution at its first meeting after its members were sworn in. Ten of its twelve members voted for the resolution while two refrained from voting, the SITA newswire reported.

A candidate who receives an absolute majority of valid votes from all eligible voters can become president in the first election round. Slovakia’s Central Election Commission agreed on this interpretation of the Constitution at its first meeting after its members were sworn in. Ten of its twelve members voted for the resolution while two refrained from voting, the SITA newswire reported.

The interpretation was proposed by the commission's vice chairperson, Katarína Tóthová, of the coalition Movement for Democratic Slovakia (HZDS). Lawyers have differed in their opinions as to whether the Constitution refers to an absolute majority of voters who take part in the elections or of all eligible voters.

Having a clear interpretation is important before the first round of these presidential elections, scheduled for March 21, since public opinion polls show that incumbent President Ivan Gašparovič may have a chance to win in the first round.

The commission's position increases the number of votes needed for victory, thus complicating Gašparovič's chances for a first-round victory. But only the Constitutional Court can issue a binding interpretation of the Constitution.

“The Central Election Commission is of the opinion that an absolute majority of valid votes from all eligible voters is needed for election of the President of the Slovak Republic,” said Tóthová, as quoted by SITA.

Compiled by Michaela Stanková from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

PISA tests: Slovak pupils lag behind in collaborative task solving

Slovak pupils are below the OECD average in collaborative problem solving, international PISA tests have shown.

Students’ tests, illustrative stock photo

The ongoing struggle for a free and democratic Slovakia

The people of Slovakia deserve the credit for the remarkable progress that this country has made over the past twenty-five years, US ambassador writes.

Illustrative stock photo

Foreigners: Top 10 events in Bratislava Video

Tips for the top 10 events in the capital between November 24 and December 3, plus regular services in different languages, training, temporary exhibitions and highlights of the year.

Christmas Markets Bratislava

Robert Fico has lost the electoral magic he once had Plus

But his party can still bounce back if they do the things that make parties resilient.

Robert Fico claims that Smer won the regional elections because it is the party with the most chairs in regional councils.