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Nemcsics launches new liberal party called Liga

Robert Nemcsics, an economy minister in Mikuláš Dzurinda's 2002-06 government, told reporters on Saturday that he has launched a new liberal party called 'Liga' (League). Representatives of the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party, which Liga aspires to join, were among those present at the founding congress on February 28, said Nemcsics, who was elected chairman of the party. Liga, which was registered at the interior ministry in mid-December, is based on the liberal tenets of the now-defunct New Citizen's Alliance (ANO), the TASR newswire wrote. These include a revision of election-related legislation, the strict separation of church and state, and a 10 percent cut in public spending.

Robert Nemcsics, an economy minister in Mikuláš Dzurinda's 2002-06 government, told reporters on Saturday that he has launched a new liberal party called 'Liga' (League). Representatives of the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party, which Liga aspires to join, were among those present at the founding congress on February 28, said Nemcsics, who was elected chairman of the party.

Liga, which was registered at the interior ministry in mid-December, is based on the liberal tenets of the now-defunct New Citizen's Alliance (ANO), the TASR newswire wrote. These include a revision of election-related legislation, the strict separation of church and state, and a 10 percent cut in public spending.

Political analyst Grigorij Mesežnikov sees only bleak prospects for the newly-launched Liga liberal party in fighting off similar parties in the struggle to win over Slovakia's liberal-minded voters. Mesežnikov cast doubt on the new party's ability to present its goals in a way that will secure the 5 percent of votes required to win seats in parliament.

According to another political analyst Miroslav Kusý, Liga is disadvantaged in that it is comprised of people who have defected from other political parties. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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