Private pension firms set out conditions for PPP investments

Private pension-savings companies (DSS) are rejecting claims that they have been negotiating with the government about financing PPP projects in exchange for a reduction in the state’s intervention in the private second pillar of the pension system, their association, the ADSS, announced on March 3.

Private pension-savings companies (DSS) are rejecting claims that they have been negotiating with the government about financing PPP projects in exchange for a reduction in the state’s intervention in the private second pillar of the pension system, their association, the ADSS, announced on March 3.

The DSSs say they are not willing to invest in infrastructure projects if excessive risks and lower yields for their clients are involved, the TASR newswire wrote.

ADSS chairman Peter Socha said that DSSs have been considering participating in PPP projects for some time now, but that they are not obliged to invest in them. There are two criteria crucial for any decision to invest in PPP projects, Socha said: profitability and security. He added that DSSs consider PPP projects to be a regular investment opportunity, for which they would demand equal conditions with banks.

Government representatives have repeatedly urged changes to the second pillar, and have recently been promoting moves to reduce the fees that clients pay to DSSs. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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