Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS...

Radvaň Cemetery

THIS IS how the Radvaň cemetery in Banská Bystrica looked in 1920.

THIS IS how the Radvaň cemetery in Banská Bystrica looked in 1920.

Andrej Sládkovič, one of the most outstanding Slovak poets, is buried within its precincts.

This postcard was published on the centenary of Sládkovič’s birth by an unknown publisher, who even decorated it with an extract from one of his poems. Sládkovič was one of the first in the country to write poetry about love. In the period of the so-called Slovak National Awakening, in the middle of the 19th century, he was strongly criticised for this by Ľudovít Štúr, the leader of the national movement. Štúr was convinced that love towards a woman is incompatible with love to one’s homeland.

Well, it is true that Štúr never married, but it can hardly be said that solely revolution beat in his heart. Interestingly, Sládkovič’s love poems were not at all unpatriotic, quite the contrary.

Indeed, his patriotism once almost brought him death. In 1849, he was arrested by Hungarians, court-martialled and sentenced to death for his support of the national uprising.

Eventually, in 1872, he died from an illness in Radvaň, where he had served as a priest.

Top stories

When the state can’t keep a secret

A selective leak has tarnished President Kiska’s reputation. But he must continue to speak out about corruption.

President Andrej Kiska

Austria launches random checks close to Slovakia’s borders

Refugees are using new smuggling routes, according to the Austrian minister.

Illustrative stock photo

Unemployment rate continues to decline

The still steeper fall in unemployment could be curbed by the type of jobseekers, analysts opine.

Carmakers have already complained about the lack of qualified labour.

Coalition only agrees on how to talk. But what will they talk about?

Budget talks to decide on concrete policies. Danko wants airplanes, Fico wants better pay for nights and weekends.

Danko, Fico, Bugar.