Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Austrian police: Checks on Slovak bus passengers were correct, but insensitive

The Austrian police proceeded in compliance with the law when they recently checked Slovak buses on the Bratislava-Hainburg line - but acted insensitively, said Austrian Interior Minister Maria Theresia Fekter in Luxembourg on Monday, April 6, after meeting her Slovak counterpart, Robert Kaliňák.

The Austrian police proceeded in compliance with the law when they recently checked Slovak buses on the Bratislava-Hainburg line - but acted insensitively, said Austrian Interior Minister Maria Theresia Fekter in Luxembourg on Monday, April 6, after meeting her Slovak counterpart, Robert Kaliňák.

According to Fekter, Austrian police carried out the checks because the buses were overcrowded, the TASR newswire wrote. This was therefore a road safety matter, which required the same rules as in Slovakia, she noted.

“I see it as a problem for Slovaks when they can’t cross borders without checks, as Slovakia is part of [the] Schengen [border-free zone]. I've promised the minister [Kalinak] that we’ll act sensitively in future in such cases and will intensify [Slovak-Austrian] communication,” said Fekter. If the buses are not overcrowded, there is no need to check them three times, she added. “This wasn’t a mistake. The police acted correctly with respect to the overcrowded bus, but this was done without sensitivity. If we’re neighbours and have good relations, there’s no need to strengthen such checks,” she added.

According to Kaliňák, it wasn’t necessary to carry out such an intensive inspection in the case of occasional travellers on the bus line, which was renewed to restore the old tradition of transport between Slovakia and Austria. In other matters, Kaliňák and Fekter agreed to improve mutual co-operation in combating illegal immigration and organised crime, mentioning the rising number of stolen cars and burgled flats in particular.

“We want to intensify the checks in this case, so that we can much more successfully fight against organised crimes. Thus [Slovak-Austrian] contacts will be much closer, but when it comes to ordinary tourism, we enjoy free movement between both states. It’s necessary to restrict checks as much as possible ... to only cases where the law is broken or an offence is committed,” Kaliňák added. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Heavy rains flood the Tatras Video

People had to be evacuated and several hiking routes had to be closed.

Stará Lesná

Trump plays with the world like a spoiled child

The White House is now broadcasting its most spectacular soap opera, beating and overcoming those of sundry leaders from different continents and different times.

Donald Trump

Last Week in Slovakia: People marched for LGBTI rights in Bratislava Audio

Listen to all the headlines from The Slovak Spectator's news podcast.

Rainbow Pride in Bratislava

Government has no plans to officially commemorate the victims of the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia

Presidents of the Slovak and Czech Republics will take a train ride to mark the founding of the Czechoslovak State.

Law Faculty of Comenius University in Šafárikovo Square, where the civilian killings by foreign armies on August 21, 1968, were most concentrated.