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Minister: Fire in Vojany won’t affect Slovak power supplies

A fire that broke out in one of the blocks of the Vojany thermal power plant, in eastern Slovakia, on Tuesday night, leading to the plant’s closure, will not endanger Slovakia’s electricity supply, Slovak Economy Minister Ľubomír Jahnátek announced on Wednesday, April 15.

A fire that broke out in one of the blocks of the Vojany thermal power plant, in eastern Slovakia, on Tuesday night, leading to the plant’s closure, will not endanger Slovakia’s electricity supply, Slovak Economy Minister Ľubomír Jahnátek announced on Wednesday, April 15.

“Citizens and consumers won’t by any means experience a shortfall in electricity [supplies],” Jahnátek told the TASR newswire.

The cause of the fire, which started in a turbine shortly after 21:00 on Tuesday, April 14, is now being investigated. According to Jahnátek, blocks 5 and 6 – the ones affected by the fire - are currently in so-called cold reserve. As many Slovak companies are currently working at a reduced level, there is sufficient power available on the Slovak market. “This is a temporary phenomenon. Of course, if industry were running at full steam we would feel the lack of this boiler,” Jahnátek said. He could not estimate how much damage had been caused, or how long the blocks would be shut down.

“We’ll have to take the turbine apart to see the scope of the damage. After that we will set a date for the repairs and re-launch of block 5,” the minister concluded.

“We can confirm that there was a fire in the plant in Vojany and that nobody was hurt,” said a Slovenské Elektrárne spokesman earlier in the day, declining to speculate on the material damage. “It is a very recent event so we don’t have any detailed information. The fire struck blocks 5 and 6, block 5 being the source. On behalf of Slovenské Elektrárne I can say that we can fully guarantee supplies … to a full extent,” the spokesman said. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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