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Future of ‘big media complex’ is unclear

IT has still not been decided whether the government will launch a project to create a common media complex which would serve as the headquarters for all the public-service media - Slovak Television, Slovak Radio and the publicly-owned TASR newswire - Culture Minister Marek Maďarič said after a recent cabinet session, as quoted by TASR.

IT has still not been decided whether the government will launch a project to create a common media complex which would serve as the headquarters for all the public-service media - Slovak Television, Slovak Radio and the publicly-owned TASR newswire - Culture Minister Marek Maďarič said after a recent cabinet session, as quoted by TASR.

Maďarič cited the global economic crisis and the disapproval of junior coalition member the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) as the main arguments against the project. In order to realise it, legislative changes are necessary, he explained.

“For that also political support is needed,” TASR quoted Maďarič as saying. “There was some statement by the HZDS, so I have to consider whether the project would be possible to realise.”

Maďarič originally intended to present a proposal for public procurement for the media complex project at a forthcoming cabinet session. He believes the project would solve the main problems of the public-service media.

He wanted the project to be financed within the framework of PPP projects, which would mean the complex would be built by a private supplier and not be paid for directly from public funds.

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