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SDKÚ to name Devínsky's successor on April 21

The name of Ferdinand Devínsky's (SDKÚ-DS) successor as chair of the parliamentary committee for education, science, youth and sport should be known sometime on April 21, committee member Tatiana Rosová (SDKÚ) told the TASR newswire on April 20.

The name of Ferdinand Devínsky's (SDKÚ-DS) successor as chair of the parliamentary committee for education, science, youth and sport should be known sometime on April 21, committee member Tatiana Rosová (SDKÚ) told the TASR newswire on April 20.

Rosová didn't comment on whether she might become the new chair of the committee after Devinsky resigned from his post on Saturday. She said that the SDKU parliamentary caucus has a session planned for April 21 at which time this issue will be raised. “Until then there will certainly be no discussion of this topic,” she added.

According to information published in the SME daily on April 17, Devínsky agreed to cooperate with the Communist secret service (StB) in 1986 shortly before he left for a research fellowship at a London university. The StB was interested in British professors and the pharmaceutical research that they were carrying out. According to the documents, Devinsky provided information on three of his British colleagues.

SDKÚ-DS chairman Mikuláš Dzurinda said in Parliament on April 17 that he believes claims by Devínsky, his party colleague and a former rector of Comenius University, that he had never been active in the ŠtB.

“The key for me was the part when Mr. Devinsky said that he never agreed to co-operate with the ŠtB. I have known him for many years as an educated, honest and virtuous person,” said Dzurinda. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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