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Presidential candidate Radičová resigns as MP

Former presidential candidate Iveta Radičová, who was supported by the opposition parliamentary parties in this year’s presidential election, is no longer an MP. She gave up her mandate on April 23 after having cast a parliamentary vote on behalf of her party colleague Tatiana Rosová on April 21 during a vote on an opposition amendment to the Education Act.

Former presidential candidate Iveta Radičová, who was supported by the opposition parliamentary parties in this year’s presidential election, is no longer an MP. She gave up her mandate on April 23 after having cast a parliamentary vote on behalf of her party colleague Tatiana Rosová on April 21 during a vote on an opposition amendment to the Education Act.

“I made a mistake, a human failure that I feel incredibly sorry for,” Radičová said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “The only way to clear my name is to give up my deputy mandate.”

Radičová had already informed her party colleagues about her decision. She also sent a letter to Pavol Paška, the speaker of the Parliament. Giving up her mandate is the only way for her to secure a future in politics, Radičová said, as reported by TASR.

The chair of the Slovak parliamentary Mandate and Immunity Committee, Renáta Zmajkovičová (Smer-SD), reacted that the parliamentary order does not allow this, as reported by TASR, saying that Radičová’s action was hypocrisy and populism typical for the policy of the opposition SDKÚ-DS party.

“Maybe she is afraid to undergo the disciplinary proceedings of the Mandate and Immunity Committee. Otherwise, she would have decided immediately, on the very day when she admitted her fault,” Zmajkovičová said. “Now it has no sense, but I also wanted to invite MP Rosová, as she said that she had asked Radičová to vote for her which would be a very dangerous precedent,” Zmajkovičová added.

Had the committee discussed Radičová’s case it would have been up to every MP to propose the sanction the committee would impose and it is possible that the committee would have asked Radičová to give up her mandate, TASR wrote. According to the Slovak Constitution she is not required to give up her mandate.

Asked whether the alleged cases of falsified signatures of SNS chairman Ján Slota made by his party’s vice chairman, Rafaela Rafaj, did not deserve the same amount of criticism as in the case of Radičová, Zmajkovičová answered that both SNS representatives had appeared before the committee and confirmed the authenticity of their signatures.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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