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Forget law or teaching, IT experts are now ‘in’

EMPLOYERS do not want lawyers any more. The most wanted professional is the IT expert. This is the conclusion from the latest study by the Academic Rating and Ranking Agency and the internet job portal profesia.sk, wrote the Hospodárske Noviny (HN) financial daily in mid-April. The study evaluated the level of interest by companies in university graduates who had put their CVs on this job portal.

EMPLOYERS do not want lawyers any more. The most wanted professional is the IT expert. This is the conclusion from the latest study by the Academic Rating and Ranking Agency and the internet job portal profesia.sk, wrote the Hospodárske Noviny (HN) financial daily in mid-April. The study evaluated the level of interest by companies in university graduates who had put their CVs on this job portal.

Schools producing programmers, IT analysts and developers took the first six places in the ranking of the most-wanted graduates.

“The profile of the Slovak economy is focused on manufacturing and logically the biggest demand is for graduates with technical education,” said Martin Hošták, the secretary of the Republic Union of Employers.

On the contrary, law, agricultural and pedagogical faculties ended at the opposite end of the ranking. According to Hošták, the labour market in Slovakia is saturated with lawyers and graduates of other studies in the humanities.

However, the choice of secondary-school graduates when deciding upon their next field of study seemingly runs counter to the needs of the labour market. Law, and in some cases also pedagogical studies, rank among the most sought after faculties while some technological studies lack new students.

“There is some interest in information technologies, but the situation with electronics and electrical engineering is worse,” Gabriel Juhás, assistant dean of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and IT of the Slovak University of Technology told HN.

“The law programmes are already full, but there are only a few applicants for information technologies,” Štefan Nozdrovický, chancellor of the private Bratislava School of Law, was quoted in HN, confirming the paradoxical situation.

Topic: Career and HR


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