Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Forget law or teaching, IT experts are now ‘in’

EMPLOYERS do not want lawyers any more. The most wanted professional is the IT expert. This is the conclusion from the latest study by the Academic Rating and Ranking Agency and the internet job portal profesia.sk, wrote the Hospodárske Noviny (HN) financial daily in mid-April. The study evaluated the level of interest by companies in university graduates who had put their CVs on this job portal.

EMPLOYERS do not want lawyers any more. The most wanted professional is the IT expert. This is the conclusion from the latest study by the Academic Rating and Ranking Agency and the internet job portal profesia.sk, wrote the Hospodárske Noviny (HN) financial daily in mid-April. The study evaluated the level of interest by companies in university graduates who had put their CVs on this job portal.

Schools producing programmers, IT analysts and developers took the first six places in the ranking of the most-wanted graduates.

“The profile of the Slovak economy is focused on manufacturing and logically the biggest demand is for graduates with technical education,” said Martin Hošták, the secretary of the Republic Union of Employers.

On the contrary, law, agricultural and pedagogical faculties ended at the opposite end of the ranking. According to Hošták, the labour market in Slovakia is saturated with lawyers and graduates of other studies in the humanities.

However, the choice of secondary-school graduates when deciding upon their next field of study seemingly runs counter to the needs of the labour market. Law, and in some cases also pedagogical studies, rank among the most sought after faculties while some technological studies lack new students.

“There is some interest in information technologies, but the situation with electronics and electrical engineering is worse,” Gabriel Juhás, assistant dean of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and IT of the Slovak University of Technology told HN.

“The law programmes are already full, but there are only a few applicants for information technologies,” Štefan Nozdrovický, chancellor of the private Bratislava School of Law, was quoted in HN, confirming the paradoxical situation.

Topic: Career and HR


Top stories

LGBTI people in the regions: We change people’s minds

Bratislava will dress up in rainbow colours this August again, for the seventh time. This will be for the Bratislava Dúhový Pride diversity festival. But the colours of the rainbow are less bright in the regions,…

Slovakia’s LGBTI community seeks to expand their rights.

Things that make us different also make us stronger

On August 19, a rainbow flag will fly over the US Embassy in Bratislava to represent the firm commitment of the United States to defending the human rights of LGBTI people, writes Ambassador Sterling.

The rainbow flag flew over the US Embassy in Bratislava in 2016.

Blog: 5 things you should do on your visit to the north of Slovakia Photo

Here is a list of tips by an experienced tour guide - including things you have probably not tried before.

Bratislava growing high Photo

High-rise buildings sprouting up in Bratislava

Visualisation of the future skyline of Bratislava