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Young Bratislavans may earn €200 more than counterparts elsewhere

It is the higher salaries in Bratislava that causes Slovaks from across the country to move there, according to an extensive internet survey carried out by www.merces.sk among a sample of 120,000 Slovaks over a one-year period, reported the TASR newswire.

It is the higher salaries in Bratislava that causes Slovaks from across the country to move there, according to an extensive internet survey carried out by www.merces.sk among a sample of 120,000 Slovaks over a one-year period, reported the TASR newswire.

“Salary differentials between regions for young people can reach €200 monthly,” according to the results, which reported that employees aged between 17 and 24 earn €628 on average in Bratislava while the average salary in other regions doesn't reach €600 per month within this age group.

"Young people in Bratislava Region earn 41 percent more than their peers in Prešov region where the young people's salaries are the lowest. So it's worth moving to the capital because of higher salaries but then it's necessary to take into consideration the higher living expenses in Bratislava,” said the survey's project manager Miroslav Dravecký for TASR.

According to the poll, the most significant difference in salaries is in the age group between 35 and 44, where Bratislava employees get 47 percent more than those in Prešov region. The differences in this age group are based on the higher ratio of highly-qualified employees and a concentration of top-management and well-paid specialist positions in Bratislava.

“In the age category up to 44, for example, in the positions specific for information technologies, the difference is as much as 94 percent,” Dravecký said.

Salaries of people above 45 then tend to be lower because of a higher ratio of this age group working for the state and in public administration, mainly the school system and healthcare. This difference is especially significant in Bratislava, the survey reported. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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