Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Economy Ministry says Transpetrol general meeting was invalid

The Slovak Economy Ministry said that it considers the Transpetrol general meeting convened by Ignac Ilčišin on April 29 to be invalid, according to the ministry's representative who attended, Peter Žiga, after a government session on the same day, reported the TASR newswire.

The Slovak Economy Ministry said that it considers the Transpetrol general meeting convened by Ignac Ilčišin on April 29 to be invalid, according to the ministry's representative who attended, Peter Žiga, after a government session on the same day, reported the TASR newswire.

Žiga said that the ministry's lawyers proposed that he should be present at the meeting due to the current legal situation surrounding the company. He said that the ministry will proceed in line with legislation and that it expects the Supreme Court to declare the meeting invalid and that subsequent proceedings will be in accordance with this decision.

Economy Minister Ľubomír Jahnátek filed a criminal complaint with the Supreme Court against Ilčišin's claimed ownership of a 34-percent stake via the Prosecutor-General's Office last week, TASR wrote. Deputy Prosecutor-General Ladislav Tichý had said that the complaint itself should have led to the suspension of the meeting and that if it did take place this would be against the law.

Ilčišin acquired the shares as a result of a seizure order directed against the state by Slovak courts a few years ago, but Jahnátek said that the process was fraudulent. If Ilčišin really does own 34 percent of the Transpetrol shares, the state will still possess the remaining 66 percent, including a 49-percent stake bought recently from Yukos International. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.