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Opposition criticises proposed law on ‘origin of assets’

If Slovakia was a democratic state where justice and the courts function reliably, we would need no law on the origin of assets, said Peter Miššík, an MP for the Slovak Christian and Democratic Union (SDKÚ), as quoted by the SITA newswire.

If Slovakia was a democratic state where justice and the courts function reliably, we would need no law on the origin of assets, said Peter Miššík, an MP for the Slovak Christian and Democratic Union (SDKÚ), as quoted by the SITA newswire.

According to Miššík, the law providing measures against unlawfully gained assets proposed by the Justice Ministry, which the government is expected to pass on to the parliament on May 20, is absolutely ineffective and bad, as it does not touch the politicians who cannot prove the lawful origins of their assets.

“It’s a Phariseanism, it’s deceiving the public, it’s about making a making the tick, saying ‘yes, we’ve done something in this situation’,” Miššík said, adding that the proposal has nothing which would require politicians to prove the origin of their assets which would allow them to be sanctioned too, SITA wrote.

According to the proposal, the assets of people who gained their assets unlawfully through links to organised crime should belong to the state. It will affect people who have gained assets which are not in accordance with their official income and that was directly connected with organised crime or who had acquaintances with people from this environment. The law would also allow the police and the prosecutor to investigate people who lived in the same household or had some connections with the assets of the prosecuted persons. SITA

Compiled by Michaela Stanková from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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