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AROUDN SLOVAKIA

Košice dances the quadrille

KOŠICE'S Main Street transformed itself into a gigantic dance floor at noon on May 15 when many inhabitants of the city, especially students from elementary and secondary schools, joined in the European Quadrille Dance Festival.

Dancers in Košice strut their stuff.(Source: TASR)

KOŠICE'S Main Street transformed itself into a gigantic dance floor at noon on May 15 when many inhabitants of the city, especially students from elementary and secondary schools, joined in the European Quadrille Dance Festival.

“I am very happy that this year, too, you had the courage and came here to show that Košice can be rightly titled the European Capital of Culture in 2013,” the vice-mayor of Košice, Marek Vargovčák, said just before the first notes of the quadrille sounded.

This international event based on synchronised quadrille dancing, a square dance of French origin, has been organised in public areas of various cities in Europe since 2002. Slovakia joined for the first time last year and the most dancers, 4,208 of them, were counted in Košice.

This level of participation earned the city first place among all European cities in the number of dancers dancing the synchronised quadrille in one place.

“This year’s performance took place on a limited space of Main Street from Rooseveltova Street to Dolná Brána and from the Immaculata to the Tesco store, and 2,772 dancers moved at one time,” said Lucia Mihóková, spokeswoman for the City of Košice Council.

The project was organised by the Meteor Košice Tanečný Klub (Dance Club) headed by Milan Plačko and Alžbeta Ligová, the city of Košice, the non-profit organisation Košice – European Capital of Culture 2013 and the Košice Self-Governing Region. The general sponsor was Východoslovenská Energetika.

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