Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovak Parliament to convene over Hungarian Viktor Orbán’s statements

Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška has convened an extraordinary session of the Slovak Parliament for June 3 based on a request by fifty governing coalition deputies. The deputies have asked to discuss a draft resolution to respond what they feel are repeated nationalistic statements made by the Hungarian opposition leader, Viktor Orbán, and some other officials during the European Parliament campaign, the SITA newswire wrote.

Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška has convened an extraordinary session of the Slovak Parliament for June 3 based on a request by fifty governing coalition deputies. The deputies have asked to discuss a draft resolution to respond what they feel are repeated nationalistic statements made by the Hungarian opposition leader, Viktor Orbán, and some other officials during the European Parliament campaign, the SITA newswire wrote.

The Slovak parliamentarians say Orbán’s statements are aiming at ethnic separation, denial of sovereignty of neighbouring countries, questioning the territorial integrity of Slovakia and instigating instability in central Europe, the spokesman for Paška, Jozef Plško, informed SITA.

Boris Zala, the chairman of the Slovak Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee and the top candidate of the Smer party in the European Parliament elections proposed to convene the extraordinary parliamentary session due to statements that Viktor Orbán, leader of the Fidesz party, made when he recently rallied Slovak Hungarians to take part in the European Parliament elections in the presence of the leader of the Hungarian Coalition Party, Pál Csáky, reported SITA.

Orbán reportedly said that that the issue in the upcoming EP elections is how many MEPs will advocate the interests of "Hungarians from the Carpathian Basin" in Brussels, wrote SITA.

Forty-two Smer deputies, six lawmakers from the SNS and two from the HZDS requested the special session. Zala insists that the Slovak Parliament has to protest against Orbán's statements. Zala said that Parliament should adopt a resolution at its special session that will clearly condemn and reject Orbán's statements.

The opposition Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK) party labelled these efforts as ridiculous. It said that politicians who act in this way consider Slovak citizens to be childish because they expect them to swallow such primitive tricks and forget that what are really dangerous in Slovakia are corruption, cronyism and an unprecedented scope of stealing public funds, said a SMK press release, SITA reported.

The SMK said it supports convening an extraordinary parliamentary session but with the goal to oblige the government to make public the price at which Slovakia sold its CO2 allocated emissions units and to reveal how many hundreds of millions of crowns were stolen from Slovak citizens, SITA wrote. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.