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Czech rock group Chinaski play in Bratislava

WHEN it comes to music, there is no talk of any language barrier between Czechs and Slovaks. Chinaski, a Czech rock group well known in Slovakia, proved this once again at their recent concert on Bratislava’s Heineken Tower Stage.

WHEN it comes to music, there is no talk of any language barrier between Czechs and Slovaks. Chinaski, a Czech rock group well known in Slovakia, proved this once again at their recent concert on Bratislava’s Heineken Tower Stage.

The concert was a part of a series of unplugged concerts that private broadcaster Rádio Expres is organising for its listeners each month.

Chinaski did not disappoint the audience in Bratislava, playing plenty of their older songs that at one time or another have rocked radio frequencies in Slovakia. These included Drobná paralela (A little parallel), Jaxe or Stejně jako já (Just like me). Fans sang along with Michal Malátný, Chinaski’s frontman, especially during songs that the band played at the request of the audience, such as Dlouhej kouř (Long smoke).

Tabáček (A little tobacco) lifted the mood of the audience after a couple of melancholy songs. According to Malátný, they don’t play this once-huge hit anymore on Czech stages as people there are simply fed up with it – but that did not seem to be the case with the Slovak audience.

“It was great to play here, the people were amazing, we are very satisfied,” Malátný said after the concert, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

The group was founded in 1987, but it’s only since 1994 that they’ve been playing under the name Chinaski. They have recorded seven studio albums; the last one, Autopohádky, was released in November 2008.

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