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HISTORY TALKS...

Stories from within the walls

“SKALICA, what a beautiful city”. These words from a well-known folk song are completely true. Thanks to its numerous sights and attractions the town, situated on the Slovak-Moravian border, has preserved its particular atmosphere to this day.

“SKALICA, what a beautiful city”. These words from a well-known folk song are completely true. Thanks to its numerous sights and attractions the town, situated on the Slovak-Moravian border, has preserved its particular atmosphere to this day.

It was exactly this geographic position that always made Skalica somehow special. The town often became, for example, a refuge for Czechs and Moravians who were persecuted in their homeland for their religious faith or for some other reason.

But Skalica did not harbour only foreigners within her walls. Those who had fallen into disfavour with the Hungarian authorities also often came to the town, as they could very easily slip to the other side of the border whenever they thought they were in “immediate danger”.

Being a more liberal town, a number of printing houses such as one run by Jozef Škarnicl were established there in the 19th century, publishing various periodicals in the Slovak language. Because of this, Skalica was one of the centres of cultural and political life in those times.

This postcard from the 1920s shows a panoramic view of Skalica. The town’s most ancient building, the Romanesque rotunda of Saint George, which was once part of the town’s fortifications, stands in the foreground.

The building is still in use and houses a permanent exhibition of precious 15th century murals.

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