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Bill on conscientious objection withdrawn by Conservative Democrats

The principle of conscientious objection will not be legalised in Slovakia for the time being in that independent MP Vladimír Palko told the Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška on June 17 that he and fellow members of the Conservative Democrats of Slovakia (KDS) are withdrawing their bill to this effect, the TASR newswire reported.

The principle of conscientious objection will not be legalised in Slovakia for the time being in that independent MP Vladimír Palko told the Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška on June 17 that he and fellow members of the Conservative Democrats of Slovakia (KDS) are withdrawing their bill to this effect, the TASR newswire reported.

The bill was proposed by Palko and three other former members of the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), who said that it was designed to enable people to pursue their occupations in line with their consciences without facing discrimination.

Had it been adopted, the bill would have released healthcare practitioners from the obligation of performing such services as abortions or in vitro fertilisation and would have allowed people to apply a conscientious objection in such areas as the armed forces, education and labour issues.

The principle of conscientious objection was the core of a treaty with the Vatican that KDH pushed for in 2006. The party pulled out of the preceding government of Mikuláš Dzurinda when its coalition partners refused to sign the document, thereby triggering an early general election, TASR wrote. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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