PSA Peugeot-Citroen to suspend production for two weeks

The Trnava facility of car-maker PSA Peugeot-Citroen is planning a 10-day production suspension from July 27 to August 9, company spokesman Peter Śvec told the TASR newswire on Thursday, June 25.

The Trnava facility of car-maker PSA Peugeot-Citroen is planning a 10-day production suspension from July 27 to August 9, company spokesman Peter Śvec told the TASR newswire on Thursday, June 25.

More than 3,000 of the company's employees will be told to go on a company-wide vacation, administration employees included. “We have to carry out this production shutdown even though from July 1 we are increasing our daily production by 50 vehicles to over 900," said Švec, explaining that some of the company's technologies need maintenance.

PSA Peugeot-Citroen has invested over €800 million in Slovakia since 2003, and its facility in Trnava has state-of-the-art technology. The plant also is one of the mainstays of the Slovak economy and is one of the country's largest exporters, as well as being the biggest employer in the region – providing jobs for over 3,000 people.

The company also noted that the number of defects per 1,000 cars produced in Trnava decreased by one-tenth between January 2007-December 2008 and it is now among the best PSA Peugeot-Citroen plants in the world. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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