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Most-Híd has enough signatures to register as political party

Representatives of the Most-Híd political party have collected over 28,000 signatures in 11 days, well above the 10,000 that they need to register the party, a member of the Most-Hid preparatory committee, Béla Bugár, said on Monday, June 29, the TASR newswire wrote.

Representatives of the Most-Híd political party have collected over 28,000 signatures in 11 days, well above the 10,000 that they need to register the party, a member of the Most-Hid preparatory committee, Béla Bugár, said on Monday, June 29, the TASR newswire wrote.

“We aren't aware of any other party collecting so many signatures in such a short period of time. It is confirmation for us that there is a demand for a new party that will be stable and predictable and will advocate the principles of decency and responsibility,” said MP Bugár to TASR. He also noted that the initiative was backed by the signatures of people living in towns in northern Slovakia, such as Žilina or Liptovský Mikuláš where very few ethnic Hungarians live.

However, Bugár conceded that he has no idea how many ethnic Slovaks have put their signatures to the initiative, as the signers' ethnicity is not specified on the sheets. The petition sheets were delivered to the Interior Ministry already. Most-Híd's first constitutional congress should be called in July, Bugár added. A group of four lawmakers headed by Bugár quit the Hungarian Coalition Party (SMK) recently and decided to set up Most-Híd. The party, whose name means bridge in Slovak and Hungarian, intends via its working methods to become a bridge between Slovaks and Hungarians. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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