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Economy Ministry provides updates on Slovakia's labour market

Large foreign investors operating in Slovakia are not planning any significant staff cutbacks for now according to the Economy Ministry which said that Samsung Galanta, Kia Motors Slovakia, Mobis Slovakia, Sony Slovakia and Volkswagen Slovakia have not announced any mass layoffs to the ministry, the SITA newswire wrote.

Large foreign investors operating in Slovakia are not planning any significant staff cutbacks for now according to the Economy Ministry which said that Samsung Galanta, Kia Motors Slovakia, Mobis Slovakia, Sony Slovakia and Volkswagen Slovakia have not announced any mass layoffs to the ministry, the SITA newswire wrote.

Only the Trnava-based carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen Slovakia reported in February a plan to lay off 190 people due to lower car sales on the European market. The ministry said that the carmaker has laid off 38 employees to date.

“Samsung Galanta has thus far reduced its staff numbers on the basis of 466 people who quit on a voluntary basis, while to date, 674 job positions are occupied of the total planned number of 800, which is fulfilment at 84 percent,” the Economy Ministry told SITA.

The Economy Ministry has registered 35,791 jobs endangered by mass layoffs since the beginning of the year. Of the total number, 15,298 employees have been already laid off. Labour offices registered 7,498 job vacancies last week. The highest number of available jobs is in Bratislava region with 2,587 openings, followed by Nitra region with 832 and Prešov region with 825 openings. The lowest number of available jobs is in Košice region with 443. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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