Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

BUSINESS IN SHORT

Prison sentences in Transpetrol trial

A PACKAGE of shares – 34 percent in total – of the oil transport company Transpetrol, never changed ownership from state hands to a group of businessmen around Ignác I., the Regional Court in Žilina ruled on June 30, the SITA newswire reported.

A PACKAGE of shares – 34 percent in total – of the oil transport company Transpetrol, never changed ownership from state hands to a group of businessmen around Ignác I., the Regional Court in Žilina ruled on June 30, the SITA newswire reported.

The court found the group of businessmen guilty of three crimes: fraud; attempting to legalise income from criminal activities along with accomplices; and violating one’s obligations when administering the property of others, SITA wrote.

The defendants were sentenced to prison terms ranging from 46 months to nine years. Ignác I. received the longest sentence, nine years.

The verdict is not yet effective as the prosecutor appealed it. The defendants may also appeal the verdict within eight days of it being delivered.

The Transpetrol criminal case has been continuing at the Regional Court in Žilina since 2002.

According to the prosecutor, 647 Transpetrol shares worth more than €66 million were transferred from the state to the hands of the group of businessmen fraudulently.

According to the Slovak Economy Ministry, this verdict will be the most important among all the 150 trials connected to the controversial Transpetrol case.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.