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Injured Englishman now well enough to be transferred home

The condition of patients treated at Trenčín Faculty Hospital after the collapse of a huge tent at the open-air Pohoda music festival that left one person dead, has stabilised and is not serious, senior physician Terézia Drobná told news wire TASR on July 20. "On Sunday [July 19] we released one patient and three were transferred home,” Drobná said. “On Monday [July 20] we released five patients, with nine remaining in the hospital. All are being treated in the trauma surgical ward."

The condition of patients treated at Trenčín Faculty Hospital after the collapse of a huge tent at the open-air Pohoda music festival that left one person dead, has stabilised and is not serious, senior physician Terézia Drobná told news wire TASR on July 20.

"On Sunday [July 19] we released one patient and three were transferred home,” Drobná said. “On Monday [July 20] we released five patients, with nine remaining in the hospital. All are being treated in the trauma surgical ward."

The country’s biggest open-air music festival, called Pohoda, ended tragically after a massive thunderstorm and gale-level winds tore down the tent covering the O2 Arena, which was hosting a concert attended by hundreds of people on July 18. The accident has taken the life of a 29-year-old man from Piestany and another 52 people were injured at the festival’s site – the military airport in Trenčín, according to the website of daily Sme.

“A Briton who is in our hospital is in stable condition,” Drobná said. “Today he was at the ENT (ears, nose and throat) department with middle ear bleeding. We are expecting conclusions from the medical staff meeting, but the injury is not acute, and with transit means laid on he could now be transferred to England.”

Barring any unforeseen contingencies, other patients could also be discharged by week's end, according to Drobná.

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