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Slovakia may withdraw from AAU sale contract, Prime Minister Fico admits

Prime Minister Robert Fico admitted on July 23 that the state may withdraw from the controversial contract for the sale of excess AAU emission allowances of CO2, purchased by the US company Interblue Group last year, newswire SITA wrote.

Prime Minister Robert Fico admitted on July 23 that the state may withdraw from the controversial contract for the sale of excess AAU emission allowances of CO2, purchased by the US company Interblue Group last year, newswire SITA wrote.

This issue may also be resolved if Slovakia cancels the contract, providing that Sk2 billion for thermal insulation can be found.

The sale of carbon dioxide emissions cost former Environment Minister Ján Chrbet his post in the Slovak government. His successor Viliam Turský made public the contract with Interblue Group public upon his appointment, but that version featured no information about the sum, the amount of emissions, the company or its authorized representative.

The prime minister endorsed the controversial sale when the opposition and media failed to present him with evidence that Slovakia sold its AAU emission allowances for less than other states, newswire SITA wrote.

The country received over €70 million in these transactions, which will be directed at thermal insulation of family houses and apartments, pursuant to the decision of the Slovak Cabinet.

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