Contaminated water causes health problems for Slovak tourists in Italy

The health problems that afflicted Slovak holiday travellers in the Italian region of Calabria last week were caused by water containing elevated concentration of coli form bacteria, Slovakia's Foreign Affairs Ministry spokesman Peter Stano told TASR on July 29.

The health problems that afflicted Slovak holiday travellers in the Italian region of Calabria last week were caused by water containing elevated concentration of coli form bacteria, Slovakia's Foreign Affairs Ministry spokesman Peter Stano told TASR on July 29.

“Thanks to the efforts of our consul in Rome we managed to get the results of tests of contaminated water from a resort in La Castella. The results showed an above-average concentration of coli form bacteria: e coli and enterococcus," said Stano.

Dozens of Slovaks initially experienced health problems on the evening of July 24 in La Castella where they visited a doctor. Afterwards, on July 25, they were put up at a new hotel. Thirty-one Slovaks returned in the early hours of July 28 while the other half are sticking with their original schedule, albeit at a different hotel. A 30-year-old man from the group was admitted to Kramáre Hospital in Bratislava on Monday. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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