IVO survey finds most Slovaks think anti-crisis measures are not enough

More than half of the citizens of Slovakia think that the government’s package of anti-crisis measures are not enough, a July 1-7 survey conducted by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) of 1,017 adults found, the SITA newswire wrote.

More than half of the citizens of Slovakia think that the government’s package of anti-crisis measures are not enough, a July 1-7 survey conducted by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) of 1,017 adults found, the SITA newswire wrote.

Fifty-seven percent of respondents were critical of the package while 25 percent had no criticism. Ten percent did not have an opinion on the topic and a further eight percent chose not to take a stance on it, SITA wrote.

IVO's Zora Bútorová said that ‘toothless measures’ were the reason for concern for a majority of women and men as well as people in each age group, education, and economic position. She said that not only supporters of opposition parties but also supporters of the ruling coalition (Smer, SNS and HZDS) are not satisfied with the crisis package. Supporters of the SDKÚ party are the most critical of the measures - 74 percent were critical and supporters of the Smer party were least critical at 53 percent. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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