Fifty-six percent of Slovaks unhappy with emissions quota sale

A majority of Slovak citizens are concerned by the attitude of Prime Minister Robert Fico towards the sale of excess CO2 emission quotas, according to a survey carried out by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) between July 1 and July 7 among 1,017 adults in Slovakia.

A majority of Slovak citizens are concerned by the attitude of Prime Minister Robert Fico towards the sale of excess CO2 emission quotas, according to a survey carried out by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) between July 1 and July 7 among 1,017 adults in Slovakia.

A total of 56 percent were concerned about the tolerance Fico has shown toward the apparently disadvantageous deal, which may have cost Slovakia millions of euros, the SITA newswire wrote. Twenty-four percent felt no concern about the issue. Twelve percent did not register the problem and eight percent of those polled were unable to provide an opinion on the issue.

Zora Bútorová of the IVO said that men, people with higher education, people in creative professions, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons were most likely to object to the attitude of the prime minister. However, almost half of people who said they support the ruling coalition parties (one of which, Smer, the prime minister leads) also expresses a critical opinion of the sale.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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