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Volkswagen Slovakia starts nonstop gearbox production

Carmaker Volkswagen Slovakia, has launched nonstop production of gearboxes on August 10 because of rising demand for cars in Europe said Volkswagen Slovakia spokesman Vladimír Machalík to the SITA newswire, adding that the company did not set a specific date for continuation of nonstop production.

Carmaker Volkswagen Slovakia, has launched nonstop production of gearboxes on August 10 because of rising demand for cars in Europe said Volkswagen Slovakia spokesman Vladimír Machalík to the SITA newswire, adding that the company did not set a specific date for continuation of nonstop production.

Gearboxes from Bratislava are being made by 160 employees working in four shifts and are destined for car makers Volkswagen, Audi, Skoda, and Seat. In 2008, Volkswagen Slovakia produced 362,000 gearboxes.

In early June, VW Slovakia officially presented its new model series of family cars. This investment will create about 1,500 jobs in the Bratislava plant. The first three and five-door vehicles made under the brands of VW, Skoda and
Seat will roll off the auto maker's line in 2011. A year later the factory should switch to full capacity with annual output of up to 400,000 cars.

Last year, the Slovak government approved investments stimuli for this project in the form of tax allowances of over €14 million. Volkswagen operates in Slovakia via its affiliation Volkswagen Slovakia.

The Bratislava factory assembles VW Touareg, Audi Q7, part of Porsche Cayenne production and Skoda Octavia. The company also operates in Martin, where its gearbox and gearbox-components manufacturing is located. A VW facility in Košice prepares vehicles to be exported to the Russian Federation. Its 2008 sales stood at €5.178 billion on 188,000 vehicles manufactured. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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