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Labour Ministry proposes minimum wage increase of 8.1 percent

The minimum wage in Slovakia should be valorised - i.e. adapted, or increased - by 8.1 percent, the Labour, Social Affairs and Family Ministry said in a report submitted to a session of the Slovak Economic and Social Council on August 11.

The minimum wage in Slovakia should be valorised - i.e. adapted, or increased - by 8.1 percent, the Labour, Social Affairs and Family Ministry said in a report submitted to a session of the Slovak Economic and Social Council on August 11.

As a result of the change the monthly minimum wage would increase as of January 2010 from €295.50 to €319.50. This 8.1-percent increase corresponds to the growth in the average nominal monthly salary in Slovakia in 2008, the TASR newswire wrote.

The Labour Ministry had to propose the valorisation because no agreement was reached between the tripartite partners (government, employers and trade unions). The increase was backed by the ministry as early as in July. Developments in consumer prices, employment, average monthly salaries and the minimum subsistence level over the past two years were taken into account, the ministry wrote in its report.

Proposals submitted by representatives of employers and employees were also taken into account. The Slovak Federation of Employers' Associations proposed lowering the minimum wage to the level in place in 2008. The National Union of Employers in its proposal noted that it would accept a compromise that would still make it possible to overcome the consequences of the crisis, stating that the minimum wage could be left at its current level. Employees' unions proposed the increase of 8.1 percent. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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