Survey: Economic crisis leads people in Slovakia to save more

More than half (52.3 percent) of consumers are currently saving more than in the past, as Slovaks show their capacity to 'uskromnit sa' (live more modestly), according to a survey carried out by TNS SK in May on a sample of 1,013 respondents.

More than half (52.3 percent) of consumers are currently saving more than in the past, as Slovaks show their capacity to 'uskromnit sa' (live more modestly), according to a survey carried out by TNS SK in May on a sample of 1,013 respondents.

Most of the remainder of those surveyed (45.3 percent) said that they were spending money in the same way as they had done in the past, while only 1.5 percent reported spending more, the TASR newswire wrote.

In addition, the results have shown that people have been trying to save mainly on major expenses and household investments (40.9 percent), expenses connected with holidays (40.5 percent), and money spent on ‘luxuries’ like visiting coffee bars, restaurants, and bars (38.4 percent). A third of respondents reported spending less on clothing (34.7 percent) and culture.

Compared to the Slovak-wide average, citizens of medium-sized and large towns – except Bratislava – reported saving more. People from Trenčín, Prešov and Žilina Regions, families with three or more children, manual workers, the unemployed, households with a net monthly income below €1,000, and households that have had long-term problems meeting their basic requirements also say they have been saving more during the crisis.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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