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SDKÚ to file legal complaint over sale of emission quotas

Slovakia’s SDKÚ party is set to file a legal complaint with the country’s Prosecutor General in the next few days over what it calls suspicions of criminal behaviour in the sale of Slovakia’s emissions quota to the Interblue Group company, the TASR newswire wrote.

Slovakia’s SDKÚ party is set to file a legal complaint with the country’s Prosecutor General in the next few days over what it calls suspicions of criminal behaviour in the sale of Slovakia’s emissions quota to the Interblue Group company, the TASR newswire wrote.

According to the SDKÚ chairman Mikuláš Dzurinda, recent evidence has surfaced that there was an option to sell emission quotas in a more advantageous way to Japan and this has made the suspicion of criminal conduct so great that this step is warranted, he told a press conference on August 13.

The information that the emission quotas that Slovakia sold to Interblue Group for €5.05 per tonne last year could have been sold for as much as double that price to Japan was reported by Hospodárske Noviny daily on August 13.

The Japanese Embassy in Slovakia confirmed for the daily that Japanese state agency NEDO was ready to sign a Memorandum of Agreement with Slovakia, which was to be followed by signing of an agreement on the actual sale of the emissions quotas. However, after several talks the Environment Ministry allegedly stopped contacting the Japanese agency, TASR wrote.

According to Dzurinda, this latest information confirms that the Slovak government did not act in the interests of citizens – and that political responsibility for this lies with Prime Minister Robert Fico who had said the responsibility lies with former environment minister Ján Chrbet from the Slovak National Party.

A representative of the Environment Ministry denies that the ministry had any specific agreement with Japan regarding emissions and it confirmed only one meeting at the ministry in the period when it was led by Jaroslav Izák (SNS) in 2008. Former environment minister Jan Chrbet (SNS) – who replaced Izak in the summer in 2008 and subsequently signed the agreement on the sale of emission quotas with Iterblue Group - confirmed that repeated talks with Japanese officials took place. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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