Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Migrants are not beggars for jobs

JUDITH Safar believes that migrants need to be given tools that help them to improve their situation and prospects on the labour market.

JUDITH Safar believes that migrants need to be given tools that help them to improve their situation and prospects on the labour market.

“Migrants need to be lifted out of the situation where they have to beg for a job,” said Safar, the team leader for professional integration at the Austrian Integration Fund. “If they progress, learn the language and are given a chance to offer their skills to society, then it is a win-win situation for everyone.”

The Austrian Integration Fund was founded by the Republic of Austria in 1960 in response to a wave of migration of Hungarians to Austria. The fund helps migrants, mostly recognized refugees, to take the first steps of integration into society, principally in language, social and career issues. However, the fund also focuses on Austrian society, in order to understand integration as a set of mutual dynamics between migrants and the majority population, according to Safar.

Professional integration includes financial support services but also mentoring for migrants, creating a win-win situation, because once the talents and skills of migrants are recognised businesses can access their labour, Safar said.

The mentoring process also increases what Safar calls intercultural competence, along with providing a practical insight into the Austrian business world, she added. According to Safar, the best way to achieve professional integration of migrants is to create synergies and a sort of networking for migrants.

Professional job coaches provide individual support for integration in the Austrian labour market. The fund also operates Integration Houses for recognised refugees, who can stay at these centres for one year.

Safar also suggested that determining when someone stops being considered a migrant is difficult because it cannot be defined simply by counting generations. One also has to look at the question of when people start having the same access to information and opportunities as the rest of society. The fund is trying to make sure that this happens as quickly as possible, Safar concluded.

Top stories

LGBTI people in the regions: We change people’s minds

Bratislava will dress up in rainbow colours this August again, for the seventh time. This will be for the Bratislava Dúhový Pride diversity festival. But the colours of the rainbow are less bright in the regions,…

Slovakia’s LGBTI community seeks to expand their rights.

Things that make us different also make us stronger

On August 19, a rainbow flag will fly over the US Embassy in Bratislava to represent the firm commitment of the United States to defending the human rights of LGBTI people, writes Ambassador Sterling.

The rainbow flag flew over the US Embassy in Bratislava in 2016.

Blog: 5 things you should do on your visit to the north of Slovakia Photo

Here is a list of tips by an experienced tour guide - including things you have probably not tried before.

Bratislava growing high Photo

High-rise buildings sprouting up in Bratislava

Visualisation of the future skyline of Bratislava