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No progress in the Malinová case

TWO police officers who were present at the interrogation of Hedviga Malinová in 2006 were interviewed on August 25 at the General Prosecutor’s Office, the TASR newswire reported. Roman Kvasnica, Malinová’s attorney, was disappointed, saying they did not give any statements relevant for the case, the TASR newswire reported.

TWO police officers who were present at the interrogation of Hedviga Malinová in 2006 were interviewed on August 25 at the General Prosecutor’s Office, the TASR newswire reported. Roman Kvasnica, Malinová’s attorney, was disappointed, saying they did not give any statements relevant for the case, the TASR newswire reported.

On August 25, 2006 Malinová claimed she was attacked by two unknown assailants. The police stopped investigating the case in September 2006 and claimed that Malinová had invented the attack.

Malinová then claimed her testimony had been made under pressure from the police officers and filed a complaint with the Regional Directorship of the Police Force in Nitra. Malinová also turned to the Constitutional Court of the Slovak Republic and to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.

Kvasnica suggested interviewing several Slovak politicians and psychiatrists who examined Malinová's psychological state after the attack. He also proposed that the wife of the general prosecutor, Dobroslav Trnka, give testimony as she had worked in one team with the person who filed a criminal complaint against Malinová, TASR reported.

The General Prosecutor’s Office is waiting for the results of expert medical reports to make a final decision on the case.


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