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University accreditation complaint is dismissed by government

Prosecutor General Dobroslav Trnka confirmed that the government has thrown out his complaint against the Education Ministry’s accreditation methods under which Slovak higher-education institutions will be categorised into universities, colleges and specialist colleges, the TASR newswire reported.

Prosecutor General Dobroslav Trnka confirmed that the government has thrown out his complaint against the Education Ministry’s accreditation methods under which Slovak higher-education institutions will be categorised into universities, colleges and specialist colleges, the TASR newswire reported.

Under the accreditation process many higher education institutions have failed to fulfil six criteria relating to science and research work and will lose their university status and will be relegated to a lower status. Trnka filed his complaint on behalf of the concerned schools and was especially critical of retroactive application of the criteria, TASR wrote.

Education Minister Ján Mikolaj said that the dismissal of Trnka's complaint means that the accreditation results remain valid. He said that schools that have lost their status as universities have one year to correct the areas where deficiencies have been found.

So far no educational institution has sued the ministry over the accreditation process and Mikolaj is confident that the entire process was legitimate. Six private universities have yet to undergo the accreditation process. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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