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Opposition party warns economic crisis might lead to social disaster

The strongest opposition party, the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), warned on Thursday, September 10, that the ongoing economic crisis posts two additional risks: it may grow into a social crisis and it may last longer than it was originally predicted, the SITA newswire wrote.

The strongest opposition party, the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ), warned on Thursday, September 10, that the ongoing economic crisis posts two additional risks: it may grow into a social crisis and it may last longer than it was originally predicted, the SITA newswire wrote.

"We are concerned that both these risks started growing recently," economist Eugen Jurzyca, who leads the party's anti-crisis expert team, told SITA. He reproached the government for still increasing its debts, emphasising that the government’s expenditures are not directed toward investments and do not support household consumption either. SDKÚ has prepared a program that it says will reduce negative impacts of the economic crisis to the lowest possible level.

The government allocated €340 million from its budget to finance anti-crisis measures this year. It also established a Council for the Economic Crisis in January to attempt to adopt anti-crisis measures based on consensus achieved by the political parties.

The council’s last meeting was held in April and according to media reports, it will no longer meet, as the government plans to discuss further measures to eliminate the impacts of the crisis through the vehicle of tripartite social dialogue. The government intends to assess the efficacy of its adopted measures this October at the earliest. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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