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Slovakia’s Christian Democrats elect Ján Figeľ as new chair

Delegates to the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) convention that took place in Nitra on September 19 elected European Commissioner Ján Figeľ as their new chairman along with six vice-chairs. Mária Sabolová, Daniel Lipšic and Július Brocka kept their posts and the new vice-chairs are Jana Žitňanská, Anton Marcinčin and Ivan Uhliarik, the TASR newswire wrote. The party has decided that Sabolová will be responsible for the environment and infrastructure issues and Lipšic will deal with interior and justice matters. Brocka will concentrate on social policy, family issues and regional development and Uhliarik will be responsible for healthcare and consumer protection. Zitnanska will focus on culture and a civil- and knowledge-based society and Marcinčin will deal with the economy, agriculture and finance.

Delegates to the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) convention that took place in Nitra on September 19 elected European Commissioner Ján Figeľ as their new chairman along with six vice-chairs. Mária Sabolová, Daniel Lipšic and Július Brocka kept their posts and the new vice-chairs are Jana Žitňanská, Anton Marcinčin and Ivan Uhliarik, the TASR newswire wrote.

The party has decided that Sabolová will be responsible for the environment and infrastructure issues and Lipšic will deal with interior and justice matters. Brocka will concentrate on social policy, family issues and regional development and Uhliarik will be responsible for healthcare and consumer protection. Zitnanska will focus on culture and a civil- and knowledge-based society and Marcinčin will deal with the economy, agriculture and finance.

Figeľ stated that he wants to have experienced and also new and dynamic people on his team. "I want to have vice-chairs with whom we can work as a team, not like a set of individuals," said Figeľ to TASR. Figeľ is replacing outgoing party chairman Pavol Hrušovský. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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