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Lufthansa computer system paralyses flights across Europe

Problems with the computer system of German airline company Lufthansa paralyzed civil aviation in Europe. The problems mainly affected Austrian Airlines which became a part of Lufthansa in September. The system collapsed on Wednesday, September 30, at 04:00 and both airline companies then began to dispatch passengers manually. The worst situations were in Vienna, Munich, Frankfurt and Berlin, the TASR newswire reported.

Problems with the computer system of German airline company Lufthansa paralyzed civil aviation in Europe. The problems mainly affected Austrian Airlines which became a part of Lufthansa in September. The system collapsed on Wednesday, September 30, at 04:00 and both airline companies then began to dispatch passengers manually. The worst situations were in Vienna, Munich, Frankfurt and Berlin, the TASR newswire reported.

“We immediately began to manually dispatch the passengers and flights. This is also possible, but of course takes longer than working when assisted by the computer,” said Michael Braun, spokesman of Austrian Airlines.

The problem did not the Košice airport, as Austrian Airlines only operates a single flight between Košice and Vienna. The system was restored on the same day in the evening hours but the company still had difficulties getting everything well in hand.

Thomas Janachov, spokesman of Lufthansa, explicitly denied any speculations on terrorist hacks involving in the system collapse. Terrorism threats have been present in Germany before the general elections that were held last weekend. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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