Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

AROUND SLOVAKIA

Bryndza-maker gets a memorial tablet

A MEMORIAL tablet dedicated to Ján Vagač was unveiled on the facade of the town office in Stará Turá in western Slovakia, paying tribute to the 250th anniversary of the birth of its native son and the founder of large-scale production of bryndza – the fermented sheep’s cheese famous to Slovakia.

Bryndza production in Zvolenská Slatina(Source: Sme - Ján Krošlák)

A MEMORIAL tablet dedicated to Ján Vagač was unveiled on the facade of the town office in Stará Turá in western Slovakia, paying tribute to the 250th anniversary of the birth of its native son and the founder of large-scale production of bryndza – the fermented sheep’s cheese famous to Slovakia.

“The first industrial manufacturing facility for bryndza was founded by this butcher and merchant Ján Vagač (1795-1835) in Detva in central Slovakia where he discovered the secrets of bryndza and large-scale production. He managed the bryndza-making on a large scale while at the same time preserving its distinctive taste and maintaining strict hygienic standards,” Stará Turá’s spokesman Ján Mikuláš told the TASR newswire, adding that thanks to Vagač, bryndza found its way to Bratislava, Vienna and Budapest and is at the top of most people’s shopping lists.

Mikuláš said that five generations of the Vagač clan produced bryndza, wandering each spring from Stará Turá to Detva and other central Slovak towns for over 120 years, only to return each autumn to Stará Turá. The invaluable contribution made by Ján Vagač to the bryndza tradition was honoured by officials of both Stará Turá and Detva as well as by other guests at the unveiling of the memorial tablet.


Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.

Blog: Foreigners, get involved

What about making our voices heard? And not only in itsy-bitsy interviews about traditional cuisine and the High Tatras.

Regional election 2017