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Radiation to be measured at railway scanner on Ukraine border

Slovakia and Ukraine agreed on joint radiation measurements of the contentious x-ray scanner that checks freight trains on the border checkpoint from Ukraine to Slovakia, Slovak Foreign Affairs Minister Miroslav Lajčák said on Monday, October 5 to the TASR newswire.

Slovakia and Ukraine agreed on joint radiation measurements of the contentious x-ray scanner that checks freight trains on the border checkpoint from Ukraine to Slovakia, Slovak Foreign Affairs Minister Miroslav Lajčák said on Monday, October 5 to the TASR newswire.

“In the week starting October 12 measurements for radiation will be made by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA),” said the Slovak official for the TASR.

According to Lajčák, the results of the measurements will be binding for both parties. “I expect that after that week of measurements on the border checkpoint, service will resume to the full extent, as was the case prior to August 19,” he stated.

Volodymyr Khandogiy, who is currently in charge of the Ukrainian Foreign Affairs Ministry, confirmed that Ukraine will accept the IAEA's conclusions. The x-ray device on the Maťovce-Uzhgorod checkpoint was turned off on August 19 following claims by Ukraine that the radiation from the scanner is detrimental to the health of staff of Ukrainian Railways.

On September 11, the two countries agreed on restoration of the X-ray scanner. At the same time Slovakia agreed that it will not scan the locomotive and first two carriages of the trains until the independent enquiry into the possible negative health effects of the scanner is completed. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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